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November is National Diabetes Month. All of us here at Ivory Dental wish to raise your awareness about the link between diabetes and periodontal disease (gum disease).

Diabetic patients are more likely to develop periodontal disease than people without diabetes. People with diabetes are more prone to infections, which slows the healing process. In fact, severe periodontal disease is often considered a complication of diabetes.

Research has suggested the relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease goes both ways – periodontal disease can make it more difficult for people who have diabetes to control their blood sugar.

Periodontal diseases are infections of the gum and bone that hold the teeth in place. Advanced stages of periodontal diseases lead to painful chewing problems and even tooth loss. Like any infection, gum disease can make it hard to keep your blood sugar under control.

Gum disease is caused by plaque, a sticky film that forms around your teeth. Plaque contains bacteria that produce harmful toxins. These toxins can irritate and inflame gums that will eventually become infected. The bacteria in your mouth can increase the risk and/or severity if you have diabetes.

Research has suggested the relationship between diabetes and gum disease goes both ways. Gum disease can make it more difficult for people who have diabetes to control their blood sugar.

Tips on How to Protect Your Teeth and Gums if You Have Diabetes:

  • Always brush with a soft toothbrush after eating, avoid hard back-and-forth scrubbing
  • Floss every day
  • Rinse after each flossing
  • If you wear dentures, keep them clean
  • Have your teeth professionally cleaned at least twice a year
  • Talk to your dentist about any mouth issues you’re having such as dry mouth, bleeding gums, mouth sores or infections, and tooth decay
  • If you use tobacco, talk to your doctor about quitting
  • Gently brush your tongue, which can trap germs
  • If you are a patient with controlled diabetes, periodontal surgery can be done in the dentist’s office
  • It is easier to control the blood sugar levels in diabetes once the periodontal infection has been treated

Harmful germs attack the teeth and gums when plaque builds up. You can keep your gums healthy and stop plaque build-up and prevent gum disease by controlling your diabetes and following the tips listed above.

Has it been more than six months since your last checkup?

We want to help you keep your teeth and gums healthy. If you are a diabetic patient, please call our office at (904) 998-1555 to schedule and appointment. At that time, we can decide a treatment plan that will best fit your needs.

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